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Clustering of Inertial Aerosols in Homogeneously Sheared Gas

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, June 9, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Mohamed Houssem Kasbaoui, PhD Candidate, Aerospace Engineering, Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University
Abstract: 

Particle-laden flows of sedimenting small heavy solid particles or droplets in a carrier gas have strong inter-phase coupling even at low volume fractions. The slip velocity between phases leads to sustained clustering that strongly modulates the overall flow.

Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, June 2, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Michael S. Dodd, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Washington
Abstract: 

Understanding how droplets and turbulence interact is important in numerous applications ranging from rain formation to oil spills to spray combustion, yet most of our knowledge of two-phase turbulence is limited to solid particles.

Simulating solids like fluids: A fully Eulerian approach to fluid-structure interaction

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, May 26, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Professor Kenneth M. Kamrin, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Abstract: 

Fluids and solids tend to be addressed using distinct computational approaches.  Solid deformation is most commonly simulated with Lagrangian finite-element methods, whereas fluid flow is amenable to Eulerian-frame approaches such as finite difference and finite volume methods.  Problems that mix

Geometry Mediated Drag Reduction Using Wrinkled & Textured Surfaces

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, May 19, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Shabnam Raayai-Ardakani, PhD Candidate, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Abstract: 

Previous investigations have suggested that surfaces textured with riblets can reduce the frictional drag force in high Reynolds number laminar and turbulent flow regimes. Shark skin and synthetic manufactured “shark tape” are widely known as examples of such passive drag reduction mechanisms.

Engineering a Small Particle Heat Exchange Receiver for Concentrated Solar Applications

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, April 21, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Professor Fletcher J. Miller, Department of Mechanical Engineering, San Diego State University and also in attendance, Dr. Miller’s Ph.D. Advisor, Dr. Arlon Hunt, former Senior Scientist at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory
Abstract: 

The concept of absorbing concentrated solar radiation volumetrically, rather than on a surface, is being researched by several groups with differing designs for high temperature solar receivers.  The Small Particle Heat Exchange Receiver (SPHER), one such design, is a gas-cooled central

Statistical Learning of Kinetic Monte Carlo Models of High Temperature Chemistry from Molecular Dynamics

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, April 14, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Qian Yang, PhD Candidate, Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, and Professor Evan Reed, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
Abstract: 

Complex chemical processes, such as the decomposition of energetic materials and the chemistry of planetary interiors, are typically studied using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations that run for weeks on high performance parallel machines.

Fast linear algebra algorithms with applications in computational flow-physics

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, April 7, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Dr. Hadi Pouransari, Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science, Stanford University
Abstract: 

In the realm of scientific computing, solving a linear system of equations is often the main bottleneck of the calculations. We extend ideas from the fast multipole method and propose a novel fast linear solver for sparse and dense matrices.

Irreversible dispersion of inertial particles in turbulence

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, March 31, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Professor Andy Bragg, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University
Abstract: 

The question of how particles suspended in turbulence move relative to each other may be addressed from the point of view of forward-in-time (FIT) and backward-in-time (BIT) dispersion.

An analytical investigation of particle clustering in turbulence

Event Type: 
CTR Tea
Date and Time: 
Friday, March 17, 2017 - 4:15pm
Location: 
CTR Conference Room 103
Speaker(s): 
Dr. Mahdi Esmaily-Moghadam, CTR Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Turbulence Research, Stanford University
Abstract: 

Clustering of inertial particles plays a key role in the formation of rain to that of the planets in our early solar system. It has been known for decades that heavy tiny particles in a turbulent flow segregate spatially, forming clusters.

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